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20121103
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throughout the couple of days, indeed the u.s. military is a global force for good and we will always seek opportunities to leave every place better than when we arrived. and i appreciate your time, appreciate your attention. thank you. . (applause). >> thank you, nita, following along we're going to have colonel barry newland. >> thanks, lewis. i'd like to thank nina for doing a great job of setting the stage so i don't have to go through and do the same thing. so great job. i do not in these slides, any pictures, i will only speak briefly. lewis asked me to come and speak on this last day of the fleet week discussions because he thought that my experiences with the afghan police might shed some light on the current news, the troubling news out there of all the attacks on our uniformed personnel by uniformed afghans and it's only been pretty recent in the news that the increases happened so he thought i might be able to add some background information on that. for about 6 months i was the senior advisor to the chief of police for kabul city police department in the capitol. back at t
share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina o
of radio frequencies, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and sheriff's department were also there able to provide u
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
. it was a display of competence. and it gives us confidence that not only is the military going to help us if we have a problem here, but the military is able to do its job of protecting our national security with confidence. it's wonderful to see confidence on display. i was asking myself as i listened to the panel today and i'm working with mike and leslie on the program, what kind of words would describe what we're doing? well, certainly impressive is one. reassuring is one, that we see what's going on, the planning, the capabilities. i think another is to underline the importance and then this panel in particular they underline t the importance of looking on this as a building operation. each year has been a little better than the year before or different. if that's been iterative or a plus [speaker not understood]. somebody asked if we could keep this going. may i remind you it's been going for 31 years. we've had this last two years that have been the most impressive iteration, but it's been going for a long while. let me try to sort of summarize it by using an image. how many of you have
to help us, that are here to practice what we preach and again also to all the different agencies that are working together with us. thank you very much for being here, happy fleet week. . >> when people ask me about our mayor, i tell them, he gets it. you can see that from his remarks just now. he knows what this is about. and a lot of other people get it, too, and i want to tell you after fleet week the senior leaders seminar last year, the word got around. and in november there was a massive earthquake in have an, turkey, and the city of san francisco and the san francisco fleet week association were asked to send a team to do an assessment of their earthquake and their preparations or lack of preparation. so the word is getting out. seattle invited us to come up and talk to them about incorporating that, this program, into their fleet week. so the word is getting out. i'd like to tell you just a story that i've told before to some of you but it relates very much to the next panel that we have here. back in april of 1992, i was commanding the first marine division and we
also have the director of hud here and he is going to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy an
, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football, frisbee, and picnics. it is very much a couple's part and there are a multitude of experiences you can have together. bring your dog and watch the mean go with the community or just picnic at o
of all of us. i'm the principal investigator on this project and that means that i'm supposed to be in charge of making sure it happens. so, we're 70% done and you're seeing one of the major parts of it today. and i want to introduce susan so we can get the show on the road. so, thank you so much. (applause) >> well, i want to welcome you all here today for the launch of our state offices aids renovation project otherwise known as soar. and i'm susan buck binder. i'm speaking on behalf of the entire aids office. we are fortunate to be a world class research organization housed within the health department which is pretty much unique globally. we have three amazing sections that we work with. the first is the surveillance epidemiology section. they really started at the very beginning of the hiv epidemic in tracking what was then known as grid and other term and became aids and then also tracking new cases of hiv infection. and, so, there's really been leaders around the world in how to track trends in new infections and that is what helps us drive both our prevention and our t
's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then of course one of our primary missions is to help students, particularly low income and underserved students, move on to 4 year institutions. we serve nearly 100,000 students in san francisco and are a tremendous resource, we think, for san francisco. the last couple years the state budget cuts we faced, $53 million in the last 3 years alone, have really
you. [cheers and applause] >> great job bochy. for somebody uses vice for a living it's never good to follow him. he's got the pipes. well, john, dwayne and mike are and are privileged to be part of this giants organization, to be the giants broadcasters but we're not the only four. there are two other members of the giants broadcast team who are critical to what we do and i think the best spanish language speaking broadcast in baseball and we want to become them to the podium now and been the voice for the giants for spanish for 15 years and his partner and please welcome tito friend. [cheers and applause] >> wow, is this amazing or what? two times in three years. we can get used to this. right, tito? yep. anyway the only thing i can say is thank you to these 25 guys right here. for years i took math and they told me that five time five is 25 but i think five times five is one because they showed they can play 25 as one individual and that's how they got it done. [cheers and applause] now, i'm going to talk to my family -- [speaking spanish] >> thank you. i just want to sa
fair buildings. or for any athletic field, call 831-5510. you can write us at -- or walk in and say hello. and of course you can find more information moresfrecpark.org. -- >>> super bowl bid committee, which i'm excited and thrilled to say. [ applause ] >> we were waiting for the nfl's announcement. we got that tuesday. now we can talk more. i want to acknowledge chris kelly, pat gallager, jim wonderman, we are expecting ron conway and mary murphy to join us. i also wanted to turn the microphone over to mayor lee to talk about why we are here. that is to unveil our logo, social media campaign. we will have rich silverstein, the head of this amazing ad agency working the past month to come to this point. we are going to hear from the ceo of the 49ers, jet york as well. supervisor mark ferrell, who will be our key liaison to the board of supervisors here in san francisco i want to acknowledge mayor reeve and williams weren't able to make it. we are committed to the effort and our theme of bringing the bowl to the bay. that will be important because we can't do this alone. we are exci
. and a lot of this is through the work of staff and the superintendent and for us to be focused on what we're doing we need to improve student achievement. now, why am i talking about education that much? mainly because i have a public record of eight years, a proven track record where i've worked with people and gotten results. so, this is the type of independent voice that i'm going to bring into district 7 as a supervisor. i will bring not only my leadership, my ability to build bristol-myers squibbvxes and build consensus, but i'm going to find -- you're going to find that i'm very solution oriented. and that i'm not wedded to any particular ideology about where the solutions come from. whether solutions come from the right or the left or the middle, it doesn't matter to me. solutions we find is solution. so, here i am. why am i running for leadership? i want to focus on our economy. i want to grow job opportunities for the students that are graduating our high schools. they are now graduating, beginning to graduate with requirements. they are totally prepared to take on this high wage
this kind of little dream we had that you became the perfect leader for us. it has come out clearly that was not only the correct decision but really enthusiastic, so thank you for stepping up. let me begin by saying there was some vibration this morning. yes, part of it, we were doing the california shake-up drill with 9.3 million in the state of california, but i think there was vibrations. mayor mathews and mayor reed were jumping up and down because i told them we were putting together something that would not only be a great way to work together but something they have also been personally wishing could happen and be led by the city. so today we are of course unveiling our promotional launch but getting here has been something on my mind. it's been one of those very solid topic that jen and i spent good time together. my office, where i call it inappropriately the man cave, but it is a place where i think we have had a chance to talk about the honest going relationship that the niners, the oldest professional sports franchise in the state of california, that's still here in the
panelists who will give us their perspective. >> so we're going to do a little bit of a hot swap here to keep the show rolling. while we seat the panel i'm going to introduce them but focus on medical. this just started up last year formally, but i have to say it really started in 2010, the idea of how do we highlight the medical because for those who don't know my history, i'm an old paramedic so this kind of comes naturally to me. in 2010 we were aboard the macon island, one of the things i was fascinated with as were the attendees was the hospital space. there were a bunch of tours that took place there. last year the idea, it wasn't my idea and i wish i could claim it but i can't, the idea to do a medical peer to peer exchange between the military and the hospital providers here in town. so it was arranged where practitioners and executives, so practitioners and their bosses, to could come out and see the shock trauma platoon and see the capabilities of the shark and see what the military brings to the table in terms of medical. it was a huge hit, to be perfectly honest. it w
it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so we can certainly hit the ground running, but then we would need some sort shortly thereafter. >> mine is a two-part question. we've seen in ismat turkey in 1999 a number of walking wounded that will immediately overwhelm the medical response community and then how do you disallow them immediate health care and the specter of reality tv, so that would be the first part, managing expectation in our gold standard health care system. the other part of that response, to maximize the saving of lives, they actually severed limbs in the response process to maximize the safing lives. have we talked about indemnify case of our medical response teams post response? ?oo ?a we did not actually discuss indemnify case or any other legal or even ethical issues on a broader kail. all the hospitals do have plans to handle a surge of patients including a very large number of walking wounded. we assume they will arrive at the hospital starting immediately, even sometimes before t
that we do day-to-day to make sure our network is available and ready to use for the public. no. 1 is back-up systems. so just to give you a brief idea of how our network works, we have two major components of our network, we have our cet sites and our switches. in our cet sites, in all of our cell sites, we actually have batteries to account for power out ages. that's 8 hour back-up time for our batteries and in addition, most of our cell sites actually have back-up generators as well. we have about 4 days of stand by time to about maybe 10 days and then on top of that we have vendors that we work with that are on stand by to make sure that we can refuel our cell sites and also maintain them if our generators do go out of service. and then as far as our switches, so the switches are control centers that manage all our cell sites. we have about 300 cell sites per switch and in the bay area we have about 4 switches. what we have there is also back-up power so we have batteries, we have generators, not only one generator, sometimes we have 3 generators to account for failure for one of
then became our secretary of defense. and many of us that have served thought that he was one of the best secretary of defenses we've ever had. he's currently a senior fellow at the hoover institute and a freeman foley institute of international studies. he is the michael and barbara bavarian professor at stanford university and serves as co-director of the nuclear risk reduction initiative and preventive defense project. please help me welcome our speaker this morning, former secretary of defense william perry. (applause) >> what a pleasure it is to be aboard this symbol of america's millery power, the uss macon island. what a pleasure it is to be among the men and women of our armed forces and the men and women of the first responders of the san francisco bay area. fleet week for many years in san francisco was a somewhat [inaudible] affair and it has been transformed into this great coming together by the military and the first responders, the great coming together of our uniformed personnel and a great [speaker not understood] of san francisco. this amazing transformation in the last
and local governments and his focus, his direction to us really comes down it 3 things. he asks us to always plan for the worst case, the maximum of the maximums and it's go to see the department of defense is incorporating this within the catastrophe policy that was spoken about a little earlier. no. 2, he asked us to sppbld and are able to stabilize an incident within 72 hours. his mantra is think big, go big, go fast but not fast. 3, he asks us to do this within a whole community approach, not only it make sure we utilize the whole community in the response because there's much more responders past the federal-state responders. there's the public being responders and there's many others, private industry need to be in that so we try to integrate that into a whole community concept. and also to make sure when we respond we respond to take into account the whole community. not everybody looks like me and you but we need to be able to take into account and service our elderly, infants and others that may need special assistance. with that, the purpose of this working lunch is to present vie
to be better than us after a bunch of trades. the los angeles dodgers are -- all right. the giants. they're down to two games of cincinnati. they win three straight. the reds are? >> audience: out of here! >> it has to be louder for the next two. are you ready? the giants go to st. louis and need to win there and back home. the st. louis cardinals are? >> audience: out of here! >> now for the big one. the mighty american league detroit tigers. you ready? the detroit tigers -- they are? audience: out of here! >> you never disappoint. here is my partner mike. >> well, we have become an organization of expertation. there's expectation when you win a championship in 2010 and there is expectation when you get in that ballpark everyday and it's over flowing with your love and affection and there is purity in the formula that this organization goes about trying to meet those standards of excellence. it starts with the fans of historians that we call investors that kept us here in san francisco and goes to the front office comprised of men and women dedicating their lives to this team
tomorrow to the republican party across the political spectrum opposes us wasting this money, particularly because it is a plan that has been conducted at least 7 times over the last many decades and each time we've been told it is a colossal failure and not one we should pursue. >> mike, this gives you an opportunity to tell us why this time would be different. >> what sean is describing is not what's in the initiative. it's just a planning process. yes, our goal is to bring the hetch hetchy valley and yosemite back to life. san francisco is the only city allowed to park its water in a national park. a hundred years we made that decision and bee think every hundred years san francisco should revisit that decision. there's no down side to that. but you can't do that without also reforming our 19th century water system. it was designed in the 19th century and as a result it's very damaging to the environment. what we do is look at how do we consolidate from 9 reservoirs into 8 and begin to build our local water resources to offset a small percentage of water loss that might happen. le
and build affordable housing and build the schools and keep us safe. i am running for supervisor to keep san francisco real. our city is a social, economic and political cross roads. in so many ways, the every-day people that keep this city special, the artists, the students, the young families, the seniors on fixed income, working people and every day people of all strides are having a harder and harder time surviving much less thriving in our city. one of the reasons is that our economic development policies are currently much too focused on the big business interest. we need to reorient our city's development policies to focus on the 80 percent of the economy which is our small businesses or mom and pop shops. san francisco needs to develop more affordable housing. the association of bay government says that they need 18,000 new units of housing and we are nowhere close to that. prop c, something that i encourage you to vote for, but let's go back to the ballot in the years to come and pass an affordable housing bond something that san francisco has not done in close to two decades. we ne
and 1 dollar from all of us. that can really help and donate at red cross .org and we thank you for your generosity. it was just two years ago that we captured the championship since moving to san francisco and i think we're happy we didn't have to wait until 52 years. [cheers and applause] we've got another trophy in this great city by the bay. [cheers and applause] so today giants fans once again you are all world champions and together we are giants, so we have a wonderful program planned for you today and i know you're anxious to get this started started and bring the guys out and celebrate your 2012 san francisco giants so let's get started. first of all we are joined by a number of special dignitaries who have helped to make san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz,
with the maritime services and the coast guard and our reserve forces, i like to think of us as america's or the world's 911 when something bad, either man-made or natural happens, some catastrophe happens in the world, often times the ambassador will pick up the phone and dial 911 and the navy marine corps team answers the phone. it is our those, it is our dna it is our ability to be there. if you look at the communicate dapbt's 3 central tenets of what he believes it importance, readiness is in there. the ability to move and go now. where do you want us, when do you want us, like fedex, we are absolutely guaranteed to be there overnight. it's what we do. it's what we are trained for. and the more we understand and can operate with civic forces, the more we understand what already exists in our life line, the more we can break down political barriers and culture barriers that exist within our own country, the more we can partner and stabilize and support civic operations, because as someone said earlier in the panel, if we need to come in, things are pretty bad. but here's the go
love you provided us selling out all 89 home games and all the wonderful fanses, and i see some of you that traveled withed team, road warriors to make road games feel like home games. you inspired us. we know you filled this plaza on sunday when we were in detroit. we know you cheer friday your couches at home, from your neighborhood street parties and then throughout october with the city we lit up the city. it was a washid orange from coit tower to the ferry building to right here at city hall. what can we take away from our 2012 giants? i believe we can take away life lessons. vuch teachable moments for our children and our team did face challenges and whether facing injuries or newly acquired players or facing elimination game one after another. what were the life lessons? never give up no matter how high the mountain is to climb. have integrity and conduct yourself with professionalism. did this team do that? absolutely. play with a team with unselfish devotion. trust one another and love your team teammates and in always do so have fun and it's meant to be played a
be a good idea for us to hear about the operations that the chilean navy had undertaken for helping out their citizens. we have a panel here today, we actually have two panels we're going to roll through. one is stories from the field, if you will, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in th
in order to get us a letter in the quickest amount of time possible, they typed it on an old typewriter, took a picture of it and emailed us the jpeg. no scaner, nothing like that, it was a jpeg of a leg. i said, good enough, it's a letter. we took that to ann kronenberg and said here we are, what can we do. in the meantime we did some brain storms, is this something real, is there any value we can add to this scenario? what we came up with was obviously we don't have the deep pockets to send over rebuilding teams or send over thousands and thousands of tons of material, that's just not what we could do. but what we could do is assemble a small team to go on a mission to van and meet them and talk to them and find out more about what do they need and is there an intersection of what we can do for them and in the meantime it gives us an opportunity to really look and see what the situation was and what we can take away from it. so that led to the next question, which all of us in government understand this one really, really well, how do we pay for it? last time i checked, home land
us that the health commission was on the verge of what i hope was in this building we're going to be able to do, we from the health commission are extremely proud that our city has been able to be at the forefront on a national and world level. i congratulate everybody. i thank president obama. i thank all of our federal, state, and local officials who have continued to support the effort of the health department of our private practitioners, of all those who are here in this final effort to end the epidemic of aids. thank you very much. (applause) >> thank you. next i'm going to introduce supervisor scott weaner from district 8 who is going to -- always supported the work that we've done here. and thank you for coming. (applause) >> thank you, thank you. and i want to wish a very happy birthday to my colleague supervisor david campos. (applause) >> it seems like just yesterday that we were here and we had our hard hats on, and we were breaking the wall there when some friends of mine saw the photos, they told me i should not be wearing a hard hat. [laughter] >> it was a learni
's a fallacy. it's about recognizing that redevelopment allowed a certain portion of money to be used for redevelopment. it's not about recreating redevelopment, in fact that's a closed chapter in history. lastly the idea we are reducing the mixed income housing is also a sort of fallacy. there is a purpose to providing an incentive for developers to do what's called mixed income housing, providing some of their units are affordable to mixed income households. most developers do not do that and this is an incentive for them to do it. this is providing a set of programs that are funded providing all the way for folks who were formerly homeless to folks who are middle income to be and stay in san francisco. >> any final comments, starchild. >> it sounds like peter is saying on one hand, well, no, it won't subsidize middle income people then he's saying there is a range all the way from middle income people all the way up to -- he doesn't say what the top range is. there's a guy named jim reid who is a contractor here he built himself in his own back yard a single unit house that he
and adults with disabilities in district 19? what do you think we worry about and how will you help us to stop worrying? >> so, absolutely, while i am a young person, i do believe that we really have an obligation to protect our seniors. and when you see services to seniors being cut, you have to realize that they have contribute to the system their entire life and this is a time that they need services even more than other moments. and when you look at what is going on, you also have to say that there is the statistic that you gave is actually the start of the baby booming population, as she growing older. so we actually need more and more services, we need to actually have people trained to provide those services as well. and so, i think, of my great aunt, who is 94 years old, who is i speak to as much as i can, when i think about what the senior population is going through and really care about their children and their future as well. >> thank you, mr. bryer. >> first off, thank you to the league of women voters and jr. voters for hosting this discussion tonight very glad to be here
+.ó boston, wens iris or boy we are allvgá÷ san franciscans. some of us are natives, like my daughters.yothers are immigrante imcome babt and myself. over the next four years as5j san franciscans, we will all expend $25 billion. i would like to see that money used to make this wind and fog swept peninsula the best that it has ever been. $25 billion is an enormous fortune and in four years time that investment could find all of our citizens on the same page, and make san francisco the envy of the world. i support projects that we all favor, and will facilitate such projects if elected, rather than ill-conceived, divisive projects like the central subway or eight washington street. i pledge, if elected as your supervisor, to serve the entire four years in that office. will the 9q make that same pledttremember ty considered being appointed as the district attorney, and run unsuccessfully for mayor twice. will he run again in 2014 for the state assembly? the incumbent, if reelected, may be real estat replaced by an apd supervisor for half the next term. i find that unacceptable in our demo
reservations and vote yes on a. >>> public safety, using a number of methods let's encourage our police and firefighters to live here in the city. we will have another earthquake and we need them here, not up in pet lululemon a, not down in half moon bay. speaking of earthquakes are you prepared? >>> right choice voting, like it or not it will be a factor in this race. i hope you'll choose me in this race. if you're already committed please consider me for second or third. whether you vote for me or not, please just be sure to vote. it's our right, it's our privilege and frankly i believe it's our duty and i won't tell you who to vote for for president, but my candidate handled don't ask don't it will and we share. thank you very much. >> my name is francis xavier crowley. as a district 7 native, i want to represent the twin peaks neighborhoods because i care about the community i grew up in and want to serve my fellow residents. my record as a dedicated public servant, community volunteer and leader of the international alliance of theatrical demonstrates my commitment to san francisco
franciscans. some of us are natives, like my daughters.y others are immigrants like the imcome babt and myself. over the next four years as5j san franciscans, we will all expend $25 billion. i would like to see that money used to make this wind and fog swept peninsula the best that it has ever been. $25 billion is an enormous fortune and in four years time that investment could find all of our citizens on the same page, and make san francisco the envy of the world. i support projects that we all favor, and will facilitate such projects if elected, rather than ill-conceived, divisive projects like the central subway or eight washington street. i pledge, if elected as your supervisor, to serve the entire four years in that office. will the 9q make that same pledtt remember that he has already considered being appointed as the district attorney, and run unsuccessfully for mayor twice. will he run again in 2014 for the state assembly? the incumbent, if reelected, may be real estate replaced by an appointed supervisor for half the n
artists. welcome to the show, deborah. tell us how this program began 20 years ago. >> the program began 20 years ago. our founder was an environmentalist and an activist and an artist in the 1970's. she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, a
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